Lake Masek Tented Camp

Lake Masek Tented Camp is a fabulous tented camp built on the shores of Lake Masek in the Ndutu area which borders the Serengeti and Ngorongoro Conservation area. The camp consists of 20 fabulous accommodation tents which are built on raised platforms. The interiors are very comfortable with large beds, traditional wooden furniture and attractive furnishings. Each tent has an en suite bathroom with flush toilet, shower and free standing bath. At the front of each tent is an open sided covered verandah for enjoying the surrounding environment. The cozy main house has a magnificent lounge and dining area as well as a well furbished library. From here you can enjoy fantastic 180 degree views over Lake Masek. Meals are often served on the wooden balcony as well as inside. This camp is the perfect location for viewing the wildebeest migration during the months of Jan to March, but is also excellent during the shoulder months before and after this period. This is a great game viewing area and has been a favourite for wildlife photographers and film makers for years. Activities from the camp are centered on game viewing. The 1.3 million strong wildebeest herd of Tanzania and Kenya trace a clockwise circuit of the great grassland plains of East Africa, following the rain and the ripening grasses. Burchells Zebras infiltrate the black mass, perhaps seeking protection amid the numbers, while other hoofed species join the migration on its fringes, a colorful carnival of herbivores trudging, lurching, and leaping across the grasslands and woodlands. The great predators of Africa are never far away from the menagerie, and the scavengers know to stay close too. The trek begins in the south, after the wildebeest birthing season in February. The herd moves northwest, chasing rain and abundance, arriving at the northern end of the circuit in the Mara Triangle in July or August. Predicting where the wildebeest will be with any precision is impossible, but, generally, the migration follows a regular pattern, although one ultimately dictated by the vagaries of wind, sun, and rain.