Home : Luxury African Safari Preparation

Prepare for African Honeymoon Safari


For visitors traveling to Africa for the first time, there are always many questions to be answered: What do we pack? What visas do we need? Can I use a hair dryer? and so on. To make your visit a truly relaxing and well-prepared one, here are the answers to all those questions, and then some.

Passports & Visas
Insurance
Security
Time Change & Altitude
Health Issues
Customs Concessions
Packing For Your Trip
Luggage
Luggage On Charter Flights
Lost Baggage
Loss Of Articles
Seat Assignments & Frequent Flier Programs
Transfers
Communications
Money
Tipping
Photography
Respecting Wildlife & Safety When Staying At Safari Camps/Lodges
Climate
Food
Water
Electric Current
Flexibility
Recommended Reading List

Passports & Visas


  You are responsible for ensuring that your passport and visa documents are up to date and in order. Your passport must be valid for at least six months after your return date. Please ensure your passport has sufficient blank pages (at least two double pages) for any visas required and for entry/departure stamps. You will also require a return air ticket, your own car, or sufficient traveler's checks or foreign currency to finance your travel into and out of Africa . 
  • A valid passport is the only documentation required of US citizens for entry into Botswana, Malawi, Mauritius, Namibia, Rwanda, Seychelles, and South Africa . 
  • Visas for the following countries can be obtained on arrival and are payable in US dollars: Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe .
  • Visas for travel to Egypt and Madagascar must be obtained from the consulate prior to travel.  
  • Please note that if you depart and then re-enter Kenya , Zimbabwe or Zambia during the course of your holiday, you must obtain a double entry visa.   
  • For entry into South Africa , a parent traveling with children, WITHOUT the other parent, will need a letter of consent from the absent parent. The letter of consent must be certified by the police.

Entry formalities vary by country and by nationality of the traveler. We suggest you check the applicable requirements with the airlines, tourist office, diplomatic mission or passport processing agency. Names of agencies can be obtained from the Internet. 

For your convenience several agencies are listed as follows:
www.globalpassport.com 1-800-644-1642
www.passportexpress.com 1-800-362-8196
www.traveldocs.com 1-800-874-5100
www.passportsandvisas.com 1-800-860-8610

Insurance


 

Travel insurance is mandatory on all African Portfolio trips. Your itinerary provides details outlining the coverage included in your safari. The Access America Deluxe Comprehensive Travel Protection plan is designed to offer broad coverage for international travel. Please refer to the brochure for general information and contact Access America at 800-284-8300 for more details on the insurance protection and services provided in this program.

Security


 

Safety and security is a matter of common sense. Therefore, take the same precautions while traveling, that you would in any major city at home. Do not carry large sums of cash with you, keep a close watch on handbags, purses, wallets etc. when walking in crowded areas, avoid walking alone at night, lock up valuables in hotel safe deposit boxes and never leave valuables in view in an unattended car or tour bus. In safari camps that do not have safes or locked doors, please keep tempting valuables out of sight. Word of advice: make copies of passports, credit cards, airline tickets and other pertinent identification and documents. Keep one copy with you, and leave one copy with your contact at home.

Time Change & Altitude


 

Southern Africa is 7 hours ahead of Eastern Standard Time (6 hours during Daylight Savings Time). East and Central Africa is 6 hours ahead of Eastern Standard Time (5 hours during Daylight Savings Time). For the first few days on safari, your body will be adjusting not only to this time change, but also to the altitude. If you experience adverse health effects at higher than normal altitudes, please consult your doctor for further advice.

Health Issues


  You will need to make an appointment with your personal physician or travel clinic at least one month prior to departure to review pertinent health precautions including necessary vaccinations and medications. Please discuss any other health-related questions with your health practitioner at this time.
  • Yellow Fever: No vaccinations or health certificates are required unless you are arriving within 6 days after leaving a Yellow Fever infected area. Note: A Yellow Fever Vaccination Certificate is required for entry into Kenya, Uganda, South Africa, Tanzania and Zambia (if traveling from an infected area). A Yellow Fever Vaccination Certificate is required for ALL visitors to Zanzibar.
  • Malaria: Malaria transmission is at its highest during the warmer and wetter months of November through to April. From May through to October the risks of acquiring malaria are reduced. The malaria parasite requires a human host in order to complete its life cycle. In most cases, safari camps and lodges are situated in remote, unpopulated areas, so the chances of contracting malaria are very slim. Nonetheless, it is worth taking preventative measures. Both chloroquine-resistant and normal strains of malaria are prevalent in Africa . Malaria is transmitted by a very small percentage of female Anopheles mosquitoes. They are only active in the early evening and throughout the night, at the times when one is usually sleeping or sitting around the campfire. A course of malaria prophylactics is advisable for all non-African visitors. Most brands need to be taken approximately one week prior to departure, once a week while on safari and for 4 weeks after you return home. Consult your doctor, nearest vaccination center or pharmacist for the most up-to-date requirements and recommended prophylactics for the area to which you are traveling. Take your tablets regularly and ensure that you have a sufficient supply for the duration of your holiday and for the additional time once you return home. We recommend that you take your tablets in the evenings in order to avoid experiencing any potential side effects during the day. Please remember that the best insurance is the preventative kind: avoid being bitten by using mosquito repellents liberally. Wear long-sleeved shirts and trousers/slacks in the evenings. If staying in a bungalow or tent, spray with an insecticide to kill any mosquitoes that may have flown into your room. Mosquito coils are also effective. If you become ill on your return, while still on prophylaxis or even once you have stopped taking them, ensure that your doctor does everything to establish that your illness is not malaria. Malaria is not a serious problem if people are sensible and take basic precautions.
  • Bilharzia: Bilharzia is a disease caused by tiny parasites (small snails) present in lakes, rivers and dams. There is no prophylactic available against Bilharzia, which is treated by drugs or an injection. The condition can be unpleasant so it's better not to swim in rivers or streams where the water is stagnant.
  • AIDS: The HIV virus and AIDS are serious health issues in many African countries. However, the risk to travelers is negligible assuming proper precautions are taken. Transmission of HIV is by bodily fluids only. Use the same precautions while in Africa as in your home country to protect against contracting this virus.
  • General recommendations: Always take precautions against the persistent overhead sun. Proximity to the equator makes the African sun particularly strong so ensure you use the proper level of protection. In the winter months, the big game areas can be dusty. Contact lens wearers may be advised to bring eye drops. Wrap-around sunglasses provide the best protection from dust and other eye irritants. Sun protective chapstick, sunscreens, moisturizing creams and insect repellents are recommended.
  • Personal Health History: Please make us aware of any specific health restrictions that may affect your choice of accommodation or style of travel.

Customs Concessions


 

Personal effects including cameras and film may be imported temporarily without a permit. A customs bond may be requested from visitors bringing in computers, video equipment, radios, tape recorders and musical instruments in order to ensure that these goods are re-exported. Firearms require a special permit. The duty free allowance for persons returning to the USA is $400 per person. You are entitled to bring back 200 cigarettes, 50 cigars or 1/2 pound of tobacco, and one quart of liquor.

Packing For Your Trip


 

The most important consideration is to remember to dress comfortably while on safari. We strongly recommend that luggage be kept to a minimum, and on some safari tours, luggage is restricted to a flexible lightweight bag and one carry on per person. Lightweight clothing in neutral colors is suitable for the bush (including a long-sleeved shirt for protection from the sun and long pants for protection from mosquitoes in the evenings). Please avoid clothing resembling army uniforms, e.g., army jackets, caps, pants. The occasional city restaurant may require smart-casual dress and even a tie and jacket. Please note that your bags are likely to get dusty and dirty en route so we advise against taking your best, smart new suitcase. Laundering in hotels, lodges, and camps is usually fast and inexpensive so try to avoid the urge to over pack.

SUGGESTED PACKING LIST

Clothing Other Essentials Toiletries
Sweat suit
Slacks, Jeans or Skirts
Walking Shorts
Shoes & Sneakers
Tee Shirts & Long-Sleeved Shirt
Warm Sweater, Fleece or Jacket
Bathing Suit
Light Raincoat (seasonal)
Socks / Belt / Sun Hat
Underwear / Sport Bra
Film and Camera Bag
Flashlight & Batteries
Sunglasses
Zip lock / Plastic bags
Wet Ones / Tissues
Electrical converter & plug adapter
Lock for Baggage
Sewing Kit
Diary/ Books/ Pens
Binoculars are invaluable; Each traveler should have their own pair.
Eye Glasses: some people have trouble with contact lenses & dust.
Shampoo and Brush/Comb
Toothbrush / Toothpaste
Sunscreen / Suntan Lotion
Insect Repellent
Cold Tablets/ Aspirin
Razor / Shaving Cream
Band Aids

Luggage


 
Do not pack valuable items in any checked luggage. This includes jewelry, cell phones, PDAs, cameras, IPODs, medication ~ and anything else you cannot live without.
Baggage allowances vary depending on the airline carrier, class of service, and routing. As follows is a list of the most common air carriers to Africa and their weight restrictions. If in doubt regarding your specific baggage situation, we suggest you contact your international carrier directly. Most city hotels and airports have facilities for storing luggage not required on safari. Please note that if you exceed these luggage limits, you may be required to pay excess baggage fees. We suggest you limit yourself to a soft, preferably waterproof, duffel bag and a carry on bag . In your carry on bag you will want to pack any and all valuables, medication, and the items you will need during your flight.
International Airlines
  • Air Kenya: 15 kg (33 lbs) per person
  • Air Namibia: Business Class – 30 kgs (66 lbs); Economy Class – 20 kgs (44 lbs); max H+W+L = 45 “
  • Air Seychelles: Two bags at 20 kgs (44 lbs) each per person
  • British Airways: Two bags at 23 kgs (51 lbs) each; Carry on – 6 kgs (13 lbs); max H+W+L = 62"
  • Kenya Airways: Club Class – 30 kgs (66 lbs); Economy Class – 20 kgs (44 lbs)
  • KLM/Northwest: Two bags at 23 kgs (51 lbs) each; max H+W+L = 62"; Carry on – 10 kgs (22 lbs)
  • South African Airways: Two bags at 23 kgs (51 lbs) each; max H+W+L = 62"; Carry on – 8 kgs (18 lbs)
  • Virgin Atlantic: Two bags at 23 kgs (51 lbs); Carry on – 6 kgs (13 lbs); max H+W+L = 62”
Regional Airlines
  • Regional Air (Tanzania): 15 kgs (33 lbs) including carry on; soft sided bags only
  • Coastal Air (Tanzania): 15 kgs (33 lbs) per person; soft sided bags only
  • Precision Air: 15 kgs (33 lbs) per person including carry on; soft sided bags only
  • Air Botswana: 20 kg (44 lbs) per person
  • Air Tanzania: 15 kgs (33 lbs) per person; soft sided bags only
  • Nationwide Airlines: 20 kgs (44 lbs) per person; max H+W+L = 17” x 28” x 35”
  • South African Express/South African Airlink: 20 kgs (44 lbs) per person
  • Zambian Airways: 15 kgs (33 lbs) per person - soft sided bags only
Internal/Charter Flights
  • Chilli Pepper (South Africa): 15 kgs (33 lbs) per person including carry on; soft sided bags only
  • Federal Air: 20 kgs (44 lbs) per person; soft sided bags only
  • NelAir (South Africa): 15 kgs (33 lbs) per person including carry on; soft sided bags only
  • Safari Air (CCA lodges/Botswana): 10 kgs (22 lbs) per person including carry on; soft sided bags only
  • Sefofane (Namibia, Zambia, Zimbabwe): 2 kgs (26 lbs) per person including carry on; soft sided bags
  • Sefofane (Botswana, South Africa): 20 kgs (44 lbs) per person including carry on; soft sided bags only

Luggage On Charter Flights


  As is noted above there are strict weight restrictions on any itinerary including light aircraft (charter) transfers for the following reasons:
  • The aircraft are designed with a maximum bodyweight and luggage weight allowance.
  • Many of the airfields used on safari are over 3000 feet above sea level and are located in the tropics, and therefore the permissible aircraft carrying capacity is reduced.
  • The aircraft have physical space restrictions. Therefore, the following considerations must be noted for these types of fly-in safaris:
  • Only soft bags (no hard suitcases can be transported as they physically cannot fit into the aircraft) will be accepted. This includes camera equipment and hand luggage.
  • The maximum dimensions of the soft bags are as follows: 81cm (32 inches) long x 36cm (14 inches) wide. Please keep in mind that the baggage compartments on the light aircraft are only 25cm (10 inches) high, so the pilots must have the ability to manipulate the bag into the compartment.
  • Passengers weighing 220 lbs or more, or two guests traveling together whose combined weight is 390 lbs or more, must please advise us in advance as an extra seat must be allocated for safety purposes (at an additional charge). These luggage restrictions may seem onerous but please bear in mind the following:
  • Most safari camps / lodges and hotels provide basic toilet amenities
  • Laundry can be done on a daily basis (and many camps provide this service free of charge but hotels do charge a nominal fee)
  • On a wildlife safari, casual clothing is the order of the day.

Lost Baggage


  As follows are several African Portfolio suggestions to protect against lost or missing baggage:
  • Time permitting, we recommend that you do not check your bags through to your final destination on your inter-Africa flights. The majority of cases involving lost luggage is the result of bags not being sent through to connecting flights.
  • Check the airline destination tags that the reservation agent attaches to your bags to ensure that the destination is correct. If in doubt, confirm the proper destination with the agent.
  • Each piece of checked baggage should be locked and should contain your personal identification information, both inside the bag as well as tagged on the outside. In addition, we suggest you include a copy of your itinerary in your bag so that the airline knows how and where to contact you once the bags have been located.
  • You may want to consider packing a spare set of clothes in your carry on bag. Lost bags are generally recovered within 24 hours but a change of clothing as well as your necessary toiletries and medications goes a long way to reduce your potential discomfort on arrival.
  • Although every precaution will be taken with your baggage, African Portfolio cannot be held responsible for any damaged or lost baggage. Retain all claim tickets and documentation to submit for insurance reimbursement.

Loss Of Articles


 

Please note that we cannot accept any responsibility for the misplacement of any articles during your travels. Naturally, our local operator will endeavour to re-unite you with your misplaced items. However, logistics may not be favourable for the returning of articles unless you are prepared to pay for the cost to get your goods to you. Any costs incurred will be for your own account. Therefore, please make sure you keep your goods with you.

Seat Assignments & Frequent Flier Programs


 

If you have not provided us with your preference for seat assignments on your Reservation Form, you will need to obtain your seat assignments by contacting the airlines directly or upon check-in for your departing flight. If your frequent flyer membership details were not included on the Reservation Form, please give this information to the check-in agent for each qualifying airline program. We strongly suggest that you retain your boarding pass and a photocopy of your ticket until you receive your mileage club statement to ensure your account has been properly credited. If you do not have a frequent flier account with the airline you are traveling on, please contact that airline directly to establish a membership account.

Transfers


 

Although we have indicated approximate transfer times in your itinerary, it is advisable to re-confirm pick up times for the following day with the staff at the safari camp or hotel or with the company providing transfer services. The local staff and ground operators will have the most current and accurate information on when and where your transfer will take place.

Communications


 

Generally speaking, communications in Africa are not what you are accustomed to at home. Connections can be difficult to nonexistent, in addition to being costly. The safari camps and lodges you may be visiting are likely to be located in remote parts of Africa and often do not have telephones or cell phone reception. Therefore, telephone, e mail and Internet services are not generally available on safari. Communication is by radio link only. However , telecommunications in urban areas are easily accessible, including e mail and Internet access, either provided at your hotel or through an Internet café. In addition, from city centers, you can usually call to the USA through the AT&T Direct Service. To make an AT&T calling card or collect call to the USA , simply dial 510-0200 from Cairo , Egypt ; 01-120 from Mauritius ; 0-800-99-0123 from South Africa ; 800-001 from Uganda ; 00-899 from Zambia ; and 110-98990 from Zimbabwe and you will be connected to a helpful AT&T operator back in the USA . Note: Access numbers are not yet available from Botswana , Kenya , Madagascar , Malawi , Mozambique , Namibia , Seychelles or Tanzania .

Money


 

In most African countries there are stringent exchange control regulations regarding local currency, making it is illegal to enter or leave the country with anything other than nominal amounts of local currency. We recommend taking sufficient cash or travelers' checks in small denominations to cover incidental expenses. Many establishments accept international credit cards and we recommend using credit cards as a method of payment wherever possible ( Zimbabwe is the exception); however, do not rely on this method of payment outside of the major cities. Please be advised that there may be a surcharge for credit card use. In addition, keep in mind that when using a credit card, the charge appearing on your monthly statement is not necessarily calculated at the exchange rate that was in effect on the day that you actually made the purchase. Only authorized dealers are allowed to exchange currency but most city hotels have foreign exchange desks or banks where money can be changed. Some banks have ATM machines where visitors can use their international credit cards to obtain local currency. Please retain approximately USD 150.00 (cash) per person for visas and airport departure taxes . US$10 and US$20 bills are recommended for this purpose. Changing bills of higher denominations may not be possible. Tips may be paid in US dollars or local currency (see Tipping section).

Tipping


  The traditional gratuity to safari guides or camp staff is not included in the price of your tour but is completely discretionary. Our general recommendation is to tip moderately – in accordance with the level and quality of service provided. The following guidelines are generally accepted practice:
  • Safari Camp / Lodge and Specialist Guides: If the guide has done a good job, we recommend US$5-$10 per guest per day.
  • The General Safari Camp / Lodge Staff: We recommend about US$3-$5 per guest per day for safari camps. This should be placed in the communal tipping box to be distributed equally amongst all the staff at a later stage.
  • Hotel Staff: Please allow between US$1-$2 per guest per day for hotel staff, i.e. housekeeping, etc.
  • Porterage: We recommend about US$1 per bag.
  • Mokoro Paddlers, Trackers and Butlers : We recommend that each paddler and/or camp/lodge tracker and/or butler receive US$3-$5 per guest per day.
  • Transfer and Touring: Driver/Guide Transfers - US$2 per person; Half day tours - US$5 per person; Full day tours - US$10 per person
  • Blue Train and Rovos Rail: Cabin attendant – US$15 per person per journey; Waiter, Dining Car – US $12 per person per journey
  • Restaurants / Hotels: 10% is customary on meal accounts but only if you are satisfied with the service.

Photography


 

The choice of the correct camera equipment and film will determine the quality of your photographs on your trip. For photography of birds and animals, a good SLR camera and telephoto lens is necessary. A zoom lens can be extremely useful on safari and the minimum recommended size is 200 mm. Consideration should be given before travelling with any lens bigger than 400 mm as most interesting shots are taken using hand held equipment. The new high-resolution digital cameras are outstanding and give great quality images, especially if you are using a digital camera body, which takes normal camera lenses. Camera bodies like the Canon D60 and 1D are superb. The advantage of digital photography is that one can get instant feedback and adjustments to your techniques can be made in the field to ensure that your photographs are the quality that you would like. Color reversal film (slides) will give far better quality than prints. The guides have found that they are getting the best results using Fuji film. Fuji has brought out a good high-speed film that gives good color with very little grain (less so than any of their competitors). This is especially useful when using a big lens in low light situations. The guides' personal preference is the slower film (either 50 or 100 ASA) as this gives almost perfect quality for normal light. However, you may consider going to 200 ASA for a larger lens in low lighting conditions. The new Fuji 400 is giving great results as well. The only disadvantage with the low ASA film is that you need a tripod for the early morning and evening shots. Film is sometimes available at safari camps and game lodges even in remote areas, but stocks are usually small and of a common type only. We suggest you buy plenty of film and bring spare batteries with you before leaving home. Film is expensive and, in addition, may not be very fresh; batteries are expensive and difficult to obtain. Out of respect for the local cultures, seek the advice of your driver/guide before photographing people. Note that certain Government, military and police buildings may not be photographed.

Respecting Wildlife & Safety When Staying At Safari Camps/Lodges


 
  • The wild animals you will encounter on safari are not like those found in theme parks – they aren't tame.
  • Most of the safari camps are unfenced and dangerous animals can (and do!) wander through the camps. Many of the animals and reptiles you will see are potentially dangerous. Attacks by wild animals are rare. However, there are no guarantees that such incidents will not occur. Neither African Portfolio nor the safari operators can be held liable for any injuries caused during an incident involving the behavior of wild animals.
  • Please listen to the camp staff and guides. The safety precautions need to be taken seriously, and strictly adhered to.
  • Don't go wandering off on your own without a guide – even to your rooms. After retiring to your rooms at night, don't leave them.
  • Observe animals silently and with a minimum of disturbance to their natural activities. Loud talking on game drives can frighten the animals away.
  • Never attempt to attract an animal's attention. Don't imitate animal sounds, clap your hands, pound the vehicle or throw objects.
  • Please respect your driver-guide's judgment about proximity to lions, cheetahs and leopards. Don't insist that he take the vehicle closer so you can get a better photograph. A vehicle driven too close can hinder a hunt or cause animals to abandon a hard-earned meal.
  • Litter tossed on the ground can choke or poison animals and birds and is unsightly.
  • Never attempt to feed or approach any wild animal on foot. This is especially important near lodges or in campsites where animals may have become accustomed to human visitors.
  • Refrain from smoking on game drives. The dry African bush ignites very easily, and a flash fire can kill animals.

Climate


 

East and Central Africa :

The long rains are from early April through early June, and the short rains from late November through December. The dry season offers excellent visibility and more reliable road conditions, and game tends to congregate around the limited water sources, making the animals easier to find. January – March and July, August are generally extremely busy in East Africa , offering comfortable temperatures. July and August are particularly popular months for travel worldwide.

Southern Africa :

The rainy season runs mainly from late November through mid-April in the safari regions; however if you are traveling to South Africa, the eastern and western Cape is experiencing summer at this time and is a wonderful time to visit. The Cape area can be cold and rainy during the southern hemisphere winter months from June through August. Often high season rates for the safari regions go into effect in July so it is sometimes possible to save a bit of money by traveling prior to that – May and June can be delightful months for sight seeing and safaris.

Indian Ocean Islands :

Generally the weather is similar to that of southern Africa , with the summer rains lasting from November through April, with occasional cyclones during that time. The dry season from May to October is ideal.

Weather Tips:

Although these are general guidelines regarding seasonal patterns, please be advised that the weather can vary dramatically throughout your trip. A light warm jacket, hat, gloves, and raincoat/windbreaker are essential depending on when you travel and the nature of your trip. We strongly recommend dressing in layers as this is an effective method of compensating for the wide variations in temperatures.

Average Daily Temperature (Max - Min in Centigrade)


Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
CapeTown

26/16

26/16

25/14

22/12

19/9

18/8

17/7

18/8

18/9

21/11

23/13

24/14

Dar-Es-Salaam

31/25

31/25

31/24

30/23

29/22

29/20

28/19

28/19

28/19

19/21

30/22

31/24

Durban

27/21

27/21

27/20

26/18

24/14

23/12

22/11

22/13

23/15

24/17

25/18

26/19

Harare

26/16

26/16

26/14

26/13

23/19

21/17

21/17

23/18

26/12

28/14

27/16

26/16

Johannesburg

26/14

25/14

24/13

22/10

19/16

17/14

17/14

20/16

23/19

25/12

25/13

26/14

Lusaka

26/17

26/17

26/17

26/15

25/12

23/10

23/19

25/12

29/15

31/18

29/18

27/17

Maun

31/28

32/17

30/16

29/12

26/17

23/16

24/16

27/19

33/14

35/15

33/19

33/19

Nairobi

31/25

31/25

31/24

30/23

29/22

29/20

28/19

28/19

28/19

19/21

30/22

31/24

Swakopmund

23/15

23/16

23/15

24/13

23/11

23/9

21/8

20/8

19/9

19/11

22/12

23/14

Victoria Falls

29/19

29/19

29/18

30/15

28/11

25/17

25/17

28/10

32/15

24/19

33/19

31/19

Windhoek

29/17

28/16

27/15

25/13

22/9

20/7

20/6

23/8

25/12

29/15

29/15

30/17

Food


 

Food is generally Continental with a remaining British influence but with the added luxury of tropical fruits and excellent curries and cold buffets. Most hotels in the main city centers offer bed and breakfast rates, while safari lodges, camps and country hotels generally offer full-board rates, with a full English breakfast, and three or four course lunch and dinner (it is quite unlikely that you will go hungry while on safari!). Tea and coffee between the main meals is included as well. Many meals will be served in a family or buffet style. Please make us aware of any specific dietary preferences or restrictions.

Water


 

Tap water is safe to drink in the major cities and in many safari areas, but bottled water is also readily available. Your hosts will advise you of the specific water situation pertaining to your accommodation.

Electric Current


 

Electricity in Africa is generally at 220 volts AC, therefore, for most 110 appliances you will need both an adapter for the proper plug configuration and a converter for the correct current. Both round and rectangular three pronged plug sockets are in use. Most safari camps do not have individual electrical outlets in the tents.

Flexibility


 

Africa is a unique travel destination for the adventurous at heart. Please bear in mind that African Portfolio has done everything possible to ensure that your trip runs smoothly and is a resounding success. However, occasionally problems do occur and changes may be required that are completely out of our control. We ask that you contact our local representative, as designated in your documents, to assist in solving any hurdles you encounter along the way. They will endeavor to do so as economically and efficiently as they possibly can. Therefore, we also recommend you pack some extra patience in your bag as it is certain to come in handy!

Recommended Reading List


 

EAST AFRICA

NON-FICTION AND GENERAL INTEREST

Out of Africa and Shadows on the Grass - Isak Dinesen (aka Karen Blixen)
The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories - Ernest Hemingway
The Hanging Tree - David Lambkin
West with the Night - Beryl Markham
The Tree Where Man Was Born - Peter Matthiessen
Africa : Biography of a Continent - John Reader
Year of the Gorilla - George Schaller
In the Dust of Kilimanjaro - David Western

KILIMANJARO

Kilimanjaro and Mount Kenya: A Climbing and Trekking Guide - Cameron M. Burns
Kilimanjaro Map and Guide - Andrew Wielochowski
On Top of Africa: The Climbing of Kilimanjaro and Mt. Kenya - Neville Shulman
Altitude Illness: Prevention & Treatment : How to Stay Healthy at Altitude: From Resort Skiing to Himalayan Climbing - Stephen, M.D. Bezruchka

SAFARI AND WILDLIFE

Adventuring in East Africa - Allen Bechky
Birds of Kenya and Northern Tanzania - Dale Zimmerman et al
Insight Guides East African Wildlife (1998 Edition)
In the Shadow of Man - Jane Goodall
Photographing on Safari: A Field Guide to Wildlife Photography in East Africa - Joe McDonald
The Safari Companion : A Guide to Watching African Mammals - Richard Estes.
Travels Along the Edge - David Noland

SOUTHERN AFRICA

NON-FICTION, HISTORY AND GENERAL INTEREST

A Walk with a White Bushman - Laurens van der Post
Cry, the Beloved Country - Alan Paton
The Boer War - Thomas Pakenham
Long Walk to Freedom - Nelson Mandela
Brave Men's Blood - Ian Knight
Scramble for Africa – Thomas Pakenham
Elephant Song – Wilbur Smith
African Stories – Doris Lessing
South African Wine - Hughes, Hands, Kench et al

SAFARI AND WILDLIFE

Behaviour Guide to African Mammals and The Safari Companion – Richard D. Estes

SAFARI: A CHRONICLE OF ADVENTURE - BARTLE BULL

Adventuring In Southern Africa - Allen Bechky
Complete Guide to Walks and Trails in South Africa – Jaynee Levy
Newman's Birds of Southern Africa – Kenneth Newman
Guide to Southern African Game & Nature Reserves – Chris & Tilde Stuart
Guide to Southern African Safari Lodges - Peter Joyce
The Lions and Elephants of Chobe - Bruce Aitken
Kalahari - Life's Variety in Dune and Delta - Michael Main
Zambezi - River of Africa - Mike Coppinger and Jumbo Williams
African Thunder - The Victoria Falls - Jan and Fiona Teede
Eye Of The Elephant - Mark and Delia Owen
Running Wild: Dispelling the Myths of African Wild Dog - John McNutt

VIDEO

Beautiful People Jamie Uys